FENTANYL HAZARD FOR LEOs

 

Extreme Caution is Required when Testing or Handling Unknown Substances

Law Enforcement officers are encouraged to use extreme caution when handling any unknown substances in the field, jail or prison. The story below highlights the dangers all our LEOs are exposed to everyday while executing their duties and responsibilities to protect and serve, and provide care and custody for those detained or incarcerated. Make sure you have the appropriate equipment on hand to safely handle these dangerous and deadly substances. If the appropriate equipment is not currently available, please contact your Business Agent and steward for immediate action.

http://turnto10.com/news/local/aci-correctional-officers-rushed-to-er-after-fentanyl-exposure

Camp Allen 2017 – A Special Day for All

Every year, for the last 45 years, Teamsters Local 633 sponsors a special day for Camp Allen attendees. Camp Allen hosts individuals of all ages with developmental and physical challenges.  Principal Officer Jeff Padellaro stated that this year’s event was once again a great success. Jeff credited the many active and retired Teamsters who volunteered their time to make this event a success. Other partners that contributed to the success of this event include First Student who provided transportation for the attendees; and Pepsi, Coca-Cola and Bimbo Bakeries who provided beverages, snakes and desserts. Associated Grocers provided transportation of all the food and supplies along with the campers’ equipment in addition to their very generous donation. 

Jeff stated that it was rewarding to see the many campers enjoying the event with laughter and smiles. He also noted that many of the volunteers also looked very happy as they observed their impact on their guests for the day. 

Principal Officer Jeffrey Padellaro expressed his sincere thanks for the many Teamsters Local 633 who volunteer their time each year to make this event a success. 

 

Scholarship Winners are Announced for 2017

 

Secretary Treasurer Jeffrey Padellaro and the Executive Board are pleased to announce the Local Union’s 2017 Scholarship Awards. 12 families were notified on July 25, 2017, that their children would receive a scholarship from Local 633.  These families were eligible for the scholarship by simply filling out the Scholarship Form that could be found on this website. As one recipient stated, “College is expensive and this scholarship is greatly appreciated.” Jeff Padellaro encourages all our members to fill out the scholarship application when it is made available for the 2018 school year.  

The Scholarship Winners are:

W. Douglas Bowen of UPS for Justin;

Noreen Cochrane of First Student Belmont for Nicholas;

Paul Farrell of Bimbo Bakeries (Thomas’) for Molly;

Deborah Foley of First Student Nashua for Aidan;

Edouard Isabelle of UPS for Brianna;

Michael Leigh of UPS for Madison;

Raymond Lord of Anheuser Busch-Inbev for Bailey;

Lawrence Macleod of Bimbo Bakeries for Colin;

Nicole McCarter of UPS for Aryssa;

Marc Riendeau of ABF Freight for Tyler;

Ronald Robinson of Derry Public Works for Chloe;

Bryan Stanley of UPS for Molly.

Congratulations to our 2017 Scholarship Winners! 

 

Teamsters Local 633 Summer Lake Tour

Left to right:   Jason Proulx, Dennis Rinki, Don Stengle, Wayne Blais, Joe Rienert, Pete Pitman, Local 633 Business Agent Rick Laughton, Karen Delph, Armand Proulx, John Gagnon (Not shown is photographer Kelly Proulx.)

On Saturday, July 29th, Teamsters Local 633 Business Agent Rick Laughton joined a group of members, retirees, and guests on a day- long ride through the Lakes Region. The ride started at the Union Hall in Manchester, NH and the group completed a 200 mile loop through the Lakes Region. Some of the lakes visited were Winnipesaukee, Wentworth, Lovell, Squam and Province. It was a perfect day for the ride with clear skies and dry roads. The lakes were in sight most of the day starting in Alton into Wolfeboro, then heading east through Wakefield to the Maine state border before looping north to Ossipee. The group enjoyed lunch together at the Yankee Smokehouse. The ride then continued from Moultonborough to Laconia and Belmont before heading back to Manchester. A great time was had by all and plans may be in the works for another ride in the early fall.   If interested in joining a fall ride, please reach out for Rick Laughton.

Secretary/Treasurer Jeff Padellaro’s Letter to the Editor

Union Leader – August 3, 2017 Edition – Letter to the Editor

NH’s prison problem

To the Editor: Gov. Chris Sununu delivered the 2017 budget address on Feb. 9, 2017.

As part of this address, the governor stated, “We are building a new women’s prison … a desperately needed asset and we’re going to get it open. We are going to be aggressive and fully fund our corrections system to end the pattern of forced overtime and personnel shortfalls.”

This promise was a breath of fresh air to the correctional officers who faithfully go to work knowing more than half the time they will be forced to work overtime and more than an eight-hour shift.

The men’s State Prison in Concord requires 371 officers to operate normally, according to a state audit published in 2012. Today, it operates with only 187 officers. The state is unable to recruit new hires or retain officers, who choose to leave for more lucrative opportunities. Compounding the problem, our new women’s prison remains shuttered because nothing has been done to address the staffing crisis that exists.

The problem is simple, but New Hampshire leaders haven’t fixed it. Our state’s compensation for correctional officers is not even close to being competitive with other like professions in the same labor market.

This crisis may have preceded Gov. Sununu, but he is the CEO of the state. He’s aware of the staffing shortage in our prisons and aware of what’s needed to address it. Now it’s time he worked with the stakeholders to resolve this dangerous situation.

JEFF PADELLARO

Secretary Treasurer Teamsters Local Union No. 633

 

 

Text of Original Letter

To the Editor:

Governor Sununu delivered the 2017 Budget Address on February 9, 2017.  As part of this address, the governor stated, “We are building a new women’s prison – as we speak – a desperately needed asset and we’re going to get it open. We are going to be aggressive and fully fund our corrections system to end the pattern of forced overtime and personnel shortfalls.” This promise to aggressively address the chronic staffing shortages was a breath of fresh air to the men and women who faithfully show-up to work knowing that over 50% of the time they will not be going home after their 8- hour shift. The critical staffing shortages routinely result in up to 50% of the posts being staffed by correctional officers who are forced to work overtime.

The Men’s State Prison in Concord requires 371 officers to operate normally, according to a state audit published in 2012, but is now operating with only 187 officers. This has occurred because of the failure of the state to recruit new hires or retain officers who choose to leave for more lucrative careers with reasonable hours.

Adding to the staffing shortage crisis is the new Women’s Prison to which Governor Sununu referred as “a desperately needed asset.”  This necessary facility will remain shuttered because nothing has been done to address the staffing crisis that currently exists.

The state has not addressed the systemic issues underlying this crisis which include a compensation package which is not competitive with other like professions in the same labor market. The governor is a business man and is aware of the solution. In fact, in Governor Sununu’s Budget Address, when addressing a shortage of healthcare workers, he stated:

 “We need to appreciate the realities of our economy, something I say a lot: markets matter. We have a serious workforce issue in virtually every area of health care. This is not a secret, we know the realities, we’ve seen the numbers.

When you don’t pay anyone any more money, it shouldn’t come as a surprise to any of us who believe in capitalism that you’re going to have serious shortages, and that’s exactly what we have today.”

The same argument is true for the correctional officer staffing crisis. This crisis may have preceded Governor Sununu, but he is the CEO of the state, he is aware of the staffing shortage, he is aware of the action needed by the state to address same, and it is time that the governor work with the stakeholders to resolve this dangerous situation in our prisons.